EXHIBITION: Jodi Stewart - A Year at Dunmoochin


"Over the years the Australian bush, clouds and drapery have developed as a kind of subconscious language for me, with ambiguous, anamorphic shapes hiding in their complexities. Drapery especially seemed to consistently evoke the hidden recesses and landscapes of a woman’s body.
At Dunmoochin, the quiet rhythms of the day encourage introspection as well as a close examination of the surroundings: the textures of the bush, the tree trunks and leaves, the ground, the moss, the twigs, the leaves. Adding drapery into these surroundings feels like a statement of humankind’s presence, an imposition that covers and conceals. The drapery has an artificial presence, a different kind of beauty to the bush, and I find the contrasts exciting and inspiring.
My recent sculptural work has focused on using draped ceramic forms that are evocative of the vulva. The visual attraction of the flowing curves and different textures of the unglazed porcelain invite touch and compel the viewers gaze to trace the lyrical lines of the sculpture, emphasising the sensuality of the material and form. 
Essentially I feel my work explores the characteristics that we insist on defining as feminine, and therefore in contrast, it also deals with what we define as masculine. These are separate concepts from male and female, and as such they are peculiarly human restrictions that we impose on ourselves, denying, in the process, aspects of our humanity."

Residents Gallery, 24 May - 11 June